Child Support in Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, both parents are responsible for the financial support of their child, and the amount of child support is determined by a serious of complex guidelines and rules. The best way to address your child support payment obligations is to talk with an experienced Pennsylvania child support attorney who can look beyond just the number calculations to get you the best possible result.

How Do I File For Child Support in Pennsylvania?

The first step in obtaining support for your child is to file a complaint in support with your county Domestic Relations Office. The complaint will detail your information, the other parent’s information and your child’s information, as well as the type of support you are requesting. A support attorney can help you determine whether you should request anything in addition to child support, such as spousal support or alimony pendente lite.

How is Child Support Calculated in Pennsylvania?

Child support in Pennsylvania is calculated through a series of guidelines and rules which take into consideration a variety of factors beyond merely how much income each parent has. These factors include things such as an individual’s earning capacity, the number of children each party has together and with others, any special needs of the child, who is providing medical insurance, who is the primary custodian, and other relevant factors. A lawyer who understands child support guidelines can talk with you about these factors and how they may affect your obligation for, or entitlement to, child support.

How Can I Lower My Child Support Payments in Pennsylvania?

The first step in lowering your child support payments is to file a Petition for Modification with your county Domestic Relations Office. There are many situations in which a child support modification is warranted. For example, and increase in custody, job loss/change in income, and the birth of additional children may provide justification for a decrease in support. If you are married but separated from the parent of your child, you may want to talk with a Pennsylvania support attorney about spousal support and alimony pendente lite. If you are entitled to spousal support or alimony pendente lite, the child support obligation can be offset somewhat.

How Can I Increase the Amount of Child Support I receive in Pennsylvania?

The first step in increasing the amount of child support you receive is to file a Petition for Modification with your county Domestic Relations Office. There are many situations in which a child support modification is warranted. For example, if the other parent has had a decrease in his/her custodial time with the child, or has received a promotion/increase in income, you may be entitled to an increase in child support. Additionally, if child care expenses have increased, or your child has special needs, you may be entitled to an increase. An experienced child support attorney in Pennsylvania can help you with obtaining an increase by addressing the factors that allow for an increase.

What Should I do if I Cannot Pay My Child Support?

You should immediately contact an attorney who is experienced in child support cases. If you fail to make timely child support payments, an enforcement hearing may be scheduled and you could be incarcerated. Your driver’s license may also be suspended until you catch up on your child support obligations. An attorney can defend against this and help you find ways to lower your payments.

Should I Hire an Attorney to Help with My Child Support Case in Pennsylvania?

It is in your best interest to hire a lawyer if you have a pending child support case. Whether you will owe child support or receive child support, a lawyer can work with you to get the best possible result. At Foreman & Caraciolo, we offer free initial consultations so that we can answer your questions and talk with you about how we would handle your child support case. Our attorneys are experienced in child support matters and offer responsive and aggressive representation. Contact us today to talk about your child support matters.